Welcome

Dear Friends,

Welcome to the Native Northeast Research Collaborative.

Welcome to the Native Northeast Research Collaborative.

In the past few months, you may have noticed something different when you accessed our website or document archives, the Native Northeast Portal.

After close to two decades as the Yale Indian Papers Project, we’ve changed our name and our website, but not our mission as a digital humanities and social justice project.

     To recover and provide greater access to the history of the Indigenous people(s) of the Atlantic  Northeast for the purposes of research, teaching, scholarly analysis, storytelling, and community-based projects.

The Native Northeast Research Collaborative better captures the nature and scope of the work we do.  And it’s less ambiguous.  We’re not about papers of Native people at Yale, nor do we edit only Native manuscripts from Yale.

Rather, this is what we are about.  Here are our accomplishments so far:

New England Indigenous Community: Inclusion & Network Building

Empowered a dozen Native communities to manage, share, and exchange their digital heritage in culturally  relevant and ethically-minded ways

Supported at least seven tribal research projects, helping to build capacity, affirm sovereignty, and enhance  cultural programs

Trained three tribal interns in digital humanities practices 


Academic Community: Pedagogical Outreach

Empowered a dozen Native communities to manage, share, and exchange their digital heritage in culturally  relevant and ethically-minded ways

Supported at least seven tribal research projects, helping to build capacity, affirm sovereignty, and enhance  cultural programs

Trained three tribal interns in digital humanities practices 


Global Academic Community: Tribally-Mediated Scholarly Resources

Digitized, transcribed, annotated, and published  thousands of previously unpublished primary  documents from the US and UK, to support research, scholarship, and  a variety of cultural initiatives

Provided world-wide access to primary source  materials to assist hundreds of scholars and historians  in the creation of more than 18 books, 14 articles, 20  dissertations, 6 exhibits, and curricula development in a growing number of schools across the country

Held or participated in 4 national teachers training workshops in Native American & Indigenous Studies topics

For our older Op-Ed Articles, go to our previous blog post “Before October 2019”.  For our new ones, stay tuned.

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